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Jun 23, 2017 1:16PM EDT
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The episode does a great job of introducing the characters and displaying their various quirks. And while the drama falls neatly into the requisite spaces, plenty of space is also reserved for a WHOLE lot of depth. In essence, Daytime Divas is The Lunch Hour plus the dishy backstage deets. The show opens with Maxine cancelling her appearance at a corporate retreat because: "It's a boy's club. I refuse to be paraded around as the token female in a leadership role." There is no doubt that she's a diva, through and through, and she also seems to have an ongoing rivalry with Oprah that Oprah probably knows nothing about. Full disclosure: I've already watched multiple episodes of this show. Yes, I know the pilot just aired, but I work in closed captioning and subtitling, and we often get new movies or TV shows before they begin airing. That's how I already know this is a very good, very solid show. While the pilot is a very good representation of what the rest of the show is going to be like, I assure you it gets even better from here. Having watched other episodes in this season is a major reason why I'm already in love with Shawn Robinson. McKinley Freeman does a great job portraying a sensitive, yet professional young man who is in tune with the needs of a show like The Lunch Hour.  On air, the co-hosts constantly interrupt each other as they argue their diverse perspectives. None of them can be said to be one-dimensional stereotypes. Daytime Divas also addresses race both explicitly as well as in the low key, subtle ways that matter more. A shot of the production team reveals a row of black women. Maxine calls out a man holding a roll of blue gel, reminding him that they have black ladies on camera, and that he should know better than that. As far as comedy goes, Daytime Divas is gold. This show flawlessly combines the vapidity associated with being a diva with the immense depth and multidimensionality associated with being a human being. Whether it's Heather and Nina arguing about the economics of textile manufacture while dressed in swimsuits, all the women arguing while standing over Maxine's comatose body in the hospital, or the show ending in fisticuffs on air, the over the top nature of this show does not fail to elicit laughs. See the full version of this review here: https://feministquill.wordpress.com/2017/06/07/tv-recap-and-review-daytime-divas-pilot/
The episode does a great job of introducing the characters and displaying their various quirks. And while the drama falls neatly into the requisite spaces, plenty of space is also reserved for a WHOLE lot of depth. In essence, Daytime Divas is The Lunch Hour plus the dishy backstage deets. The show opens with Maxine cancelling her appearance at a corporate retreat because: "It's a boy's club. I refuse to be paraded around as the token female in a leadership role." There is no doubt that she's a diva, through and through, and she also seems to have an ongoing rivalry with Oprah that Oprah probably knows nothing about. Full disclosure: I've already watched multiple episodes of this show. Yes, I know the pilot just aired, but I work in closed captioning and subtitling, and we often get new movies or TV shows before they begin airing. That's how I already know this is a very good, very solid show. While the pilot is a very good representation of what the rest of the show is going to be like, I assure you it gets even better from here. Having watched other episodes in this season is a major reason why I'm already in love with Shawn Robinson. McKinley Freeman does a great job portraying a sensitive, yet professional young man who is in tune with the needs of a show like The Lunch Hour.  On air, the co-hosts constantly interrupt each other as they argue their diverse perspectives. None of them can be said to be one-dimensional stereotypes. Daytime Divas also addresses race both explicitly as well as in the low key, subtle ways that matter more. A shot of the production team reveals a row of black women. Maxine calls out a man holding a roll of blue gel, reminding him that they have black ladies on camera, and that he should know better than that. As far as comedy goes, Daytime Divas is gold. This show flawlessly combines the vapidity associated with being a diva with the immense depth and multidimensionality associated with being a human being. Whether it's Heather and Nina arguing about the economics of textile manufacture while dressed in swimsuits, all the women arguing while standing over Maxine's comatose body in the hospital, or the show ending in fisticuffs on air, the over the top nature of this show does not fail to elicit laughs. See the full version of this review here: https://feministquill.wordpress.com/2017/06/07/tv-recap-and-review-daytime-divas-pilot/